Toronto’s Tiniest House

Built in 1912, “The Little House” measures 7′ wide and 47′ deep and is Toronto’s small home. The builder and well-known contractor Arthur Weeden built the home on what was originally intended to be a laneway to the neighboring house. The laneway was never built so Mr. Weeden built the tiny house and lived in it with his wife for 20+ years with a little garden behind the tiny house where they grew veggies and flowers. The house was almost completely renovated in 2007. What’s great about this home is that is makes use of a space that would have been otherwise wasted. Butted up against the large homes beside it, it also helps contrast the size between typical homes and a tiny house.

Here are some photos of The Little House, Toronto’s tiniest house. Enjoy.

Visit The Little House website here.

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Category : Blog

7 Comments → “Toronto’s Tiniest House”

  1. That is too cool!

    Reply

  2. Paul

    Apr 14, 2012

    Amazing what you can fit in when you try! Really well-laid out and bright!

    Reply

  3. Cory

    Aug 06, 2012

    That is just too kool!,,,
    What is the price.

    Reply

  4. Holly

    Dec 22, 2012

    So cool!.I didnt expect it to be that big inside,

    Reply

  5. Carla

    Mar 06, 2013

    Where is the bedroom? How do u get to the top window in the Peak? Where is the Refrigerator? I see the washer and dryer which is amazing being in this tiny house. Very Cool house love it….Would like to see more angles of this house if possible…..

    Reply

    • Kestrel

      May 01, 2013

      The house is 7′ wide and 7′ deep? I don’t think so. That would make it a cube. Does the word “deep” mean something else – height, maybe?
      Anyways, Carla, I think the fridge would be located in the drawer/cabinet by the sink. It’s very common in tighter spaces in the world (China, Japan, London, etc) to have those instead of the American closet-size unit. Also, that window is probably accessed by a ladder which could be hidden inside the wardrobes in the bedroom area. Is there a Murphy bed behind those doors?
      I can’t believe they lives there for 20 years! Kudos for keeping it small. American houses are how somewhere around 2200 sq.ft. On average and we ALWAYS complain about needing more storage. What do we need to keep storing??
      I’d love to know what the home’s valued at….who could say what the market will bear for a bitty little fairy house like this!

      Reply

      • Cristykay

        Jun 22, 2013

        The author said 7′ by 47′. I would re-check something before I rag on the author. But, I must agree with your assesment of American homes being too big. Imagine 2 people living in this space for 20 years. That kind of closeness will either make or break a relationship. In the old days, most families lived in one room cabins. I think that kind of close knit life helped families stay close. However, today, most women and men want a home office or some kind “man cave” to get away and have “me” time. But, what they don’t seem to realize is that the place they go for “me” time wouldn’t be necessary if they took that square footage out of their budget. Just because the bank will give you a loan for a certain amount does not mean you have to use 100% of the pre-certified loan. Less is more definitely applies in this situation. What is sad, in today’s economy, is that you can buy a house for less (foreclosures, tiny house, yurts…ect.) than a car. A truck my father bought 30 yrs. ago (brand new with all the trimmings – even an installed car phone) now cost a 100% more than it did back then. Even an SUV I bought 12 years ago cost more now than it did then. The same make, model and year, but minus the brand new engine mine came with. However, I have only really found this phenomenon in Texas. I believe that is because we are one of the few States whose economy is growing and did not really get hit hard by the Stock Market crash. Something is wrong with the system when you can buy a place to live cheaper than you can something to drive

        Reply

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